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Bacteriology 2019

About Conference


Conference Series LLC Ltd invites all the participants from all over the world to attend 7th International Conference and Exhibition on Bacteriology & Antibiotics during April 24-25, 2019 at Vancouver, Canada which includes keynote presentations, Oral talks, Poster presentations and Exhibitions.  

For more details download our brochure here:  https://bacteriology.conferenceseries.com/conference-brochure.php

Find more reviews about our organization @ www.conferenceseries.com/usa-meetings/reviews

Bacteriology 2019 aims to bring together leading academic scientists, researchers and research scholars to exchange and share their experiences and research results on all aspects of Bacteriology & Antibiotics. It also provides a premier interdisciplinary platform for researchers, practitioners and educators to present and discuss the most recent innovations, trends, and concerns as well as practical challenges encountered and solutions adopted in the fields of Bacteriology.

All honourable authors are kindly encouraged to contribute to and help shape the conference through submissions of their research abstracts, papers and e-posters in all areas of Bacteriology & Antibiotics are cordially invited for presentation at the conference.

Bacteriology 2019 is anticipating participants from 40 and more countries across the globe and the two day conference will provoke plenary sessions, Keynote speeches, Poster, and Oral presentations. This program provides two days of robust discussions on recent advancements and new strategies for development of new materials for global requirements.

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We would also like to bring to your kind notice that we have 300+ journals where you can publish your full length manuscripts at discounted price. If you are interested please contact me [ [email protected] ] for further details.

Our pleasure to meet you in upcoming event…!!!

Sessions and Tracks

Track 01: Microbiology 

Microbiology is the study of all living organisms that are too small to be visible with the naked eye. This includes bacteria, archaea, viruses, fungi, prions, protozoa and algae, collectively known as 'microbes'. These microbes play key roles in nutrient cycling, biodegradation/biodeterioration, climate change, food spoilage, the cause and control of disease, and biotechnology. Microbes can be put to work in many ways: making life-saving drugs, the manufacture of biofuels, cleaning up pollution, and producing/processing food and drink.

Track 02: Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is a bacterial infection that alters the urinary system that produces, stores, and eliminates urine. The causative of the infection is a bacteria called Escherichia coli. Composition of urine is salts, fluids and waste produces, but does not usually have bacteria in it. Bacteria inflowing the bladder or kidney can multiply rapidly in the urine, causing a UTI (urinary tract infection). Cystitis is the most common type of UTI and mostoftenly referred to as a bladder infection. A kidney infection, also known as pyelonephritis is potentially more serious.

Infections of the bladder and/or urethra are known as lower urinary tract infections; if it occurs in the kidneys or ureters they are known as upper urinary tract infections. In general, urinary tract infections are simply and effectively treated with a short course of antibiotics. However, infection can cause uneasiness, to the patient suffering pain at the time of urination, a frequent desire to urinate, and cloudy urine. Women are more likely than men to have a UTI. This is because in women the urethra is nearer to the anus than it is in men, which makes it easier for bacteria to get from the anus to the urethra. In women the urethra is also much shorter than it is in men, making it easier for bacteria to contact the bladder. Antibiotics are used to treat UTIs. The majority cases of UTIs clear up after a few days of drug treatment, although more severe cases may require few weeks of treatment. Guidelines recommend using nitrofurantoin or trimethoprin-sulfamethoxazole as first-line antibiotic treatments for UTIs. Fluoroquinolones (such as ciprofloxacin) are now only recommended when other antibiotics are not appropriate.

Track 03: Parasitic infection

Parasites are organisms that live off other organisms, or hosts, to survive. Some parasites don’t noticeably affect their hosts. Others grow, reproduce, or invade organ systems that make their hosts sick, resulting in a parasitic infection. Parasitic infections are a big problem in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Malaria is one of the deadliest parasitic diseases. Some parasites like Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium spp. can cause disease directly, but other organisms can cause disease by the toxins that they produce.

 

Track 04: Antibiotics: Market Analysis & Business Opportunities

Antibiotics, also called antibacterials or antimicrobials, is a group of medicines used in the treatment of infections caused by germs—bacteria and certain parasites—by inhibiting the growth of microorganisms or killing them. Since the discovery of the antibiotic penicillin in 1920, various antibiotic compounds have been widely used to treat several bacterial infections. Increasing incidence of chronic and infectious diseases across the globe and efficacy of antibiotics to treat a wide spectrum of bacterial infections have led to the rapid evolution of the global antibiotic market. Based on geography, the report segments the global antibiotic markets into North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Rest of the World (ROW). Currently, Asia Pacific accounts for the leading share in the global antibiotic market. The region is likely to present exciting growth opportunities along the forecast period, driven by the prevalence of various infectious diseases, favorable regulatory reforms, and significant demand for generic medicines. A large number of players have been actively focusing on new drug development and clinical trials. Prominent biotechnology companies are entering into strategic alliances, which has helped them make considerable investments in drug discovery. Pharmaceutical companies are actively developing analogues of existing antibiotic classes based on innovative approaches to fight bacterial infections. Key players operating in the global antibiotic market include Pfizer Inc., Astellas Pharma, Inc, Roche, Novartis AG, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., Bayer HealthCare AG, Abbott Laboratories, MiddleBrook Pharmaceuticals, Takeda Pharmaceutical Company, Ltd., Daiichi Sankyo Company, Ltd., GlaxoSmithKline Plc, Eli Lilly and Co., and Kyorin Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. The antibiotics market was valued at USD 39.8 billion in 2015 and is expected to witness a CAGR of 4.0% over the forecast period. Increasing efforts are being witnessed toward the development of advanced products. According to the data published by the Pew Charitable Trust, in March 2016, about 37 promising molecules were being investigated within the U.S. market. Majority of these, are in phase II clinical trials and are anticipated to hit the market between 2018 - 2020. Furthermore, supportive government legislations, such as the Generating Antibiotics Incentives Now (GAIN) Act are expected to expedite the approval process. GAIN Act has provisions which facilitate development of therapy against antibiotic resistant pathogens.

 

Track 05: Bacterial pathogenesis

Bacterial pathogenesis is the process by which bacteria infect and cause disease in a host. Not all bacteria are pathogens and have the ability for pathogenesis (also known as virulence). Pathogenic bacteria utilise a number of mechanisms to cause disease in human hosts. Bacterial pathogens express a wide range of molecules that bind host cell targets to facilitate a variety of different host responses. The molecular strategies used by bacteria to interact with the host can be unique to specific pathogens or conserved across several different species. A key to fighting bacterial disease is the identification and characterisation of all these different strategies. The availability of complete genome sequences for several bacterial pathogens coupled with bioinformatics will lead to significant advances toward this goal. There are several bacterial pathogenic diseases. One among them is tuberculosis which is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. It includes other pathogens of bacteria such as Streptococcus and Pseudomonas. These pathogens and form of bacteria causes many foodborne illnesses and infections such as tetanus, typhoid fever and diphtheria. Microbes express their pathogenicity by means of their virulence. The determinants of virulence of a pathogen are any of its genetic or biochemical or structural features that enable it to produce disease in a host. In bacterial host mediated pathogenesis, (e.g., tuberculosis), tissue damage results from the toxic mediators released by lymphoid cells rather than from bacterial toxins.

Track 06: Antibiotics

Antibiotics also called antibacterials, are a type of antimicrobial drug used in the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections.They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. A limited number of antibiotics also possess antiprotozoal activity. Antibiotics are not effective against viruses such as the common cold or influenza; drugs which inhibit viruses are termed antiviral drugs or antivirals rather than antibiotics. In 1926, Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin, a substance produced by fungi that appeared able to inhibit bacterial growth. Another antibiotic, for example, is tetracycline, a broad-spectrum agent effective against a wide variety of bacteria including Hemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia psittaci, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoea, and many others.

Track 07: Pharmacology of antibiotics

The term antibiotic is now generally used to include antimicrobial substances produced by chemical means as well as those produced by micro-organisms. They may be either bacteriostatic or bacteriocidal. A bacteriostatic antibiotic inhibits the growth and replication of bacteria thereby giving the body's natural defence mechanisms time to become effective in overcoming an infection. In the majority of cases, and particularly in patients whose natural resistance is lowered by disorders of the immune system, it is preferable to choose a bacteriocidal agent. The first bacteriocidal antibiotic was penicillin G. Knowledge of how the body handles a drug, in particular an understanding of absorption, distribution and excretion, helps to provide rational dose regimes which give therapeutic concentrations but keep adverse reactions to a minimum. The two important features of the structure of penicillin are the (3-lactam ring and the side-chain. Alterations in the side-chain give rise to differences in resistance to gastric acid and variation in antibacterial spectrum. In general, increasing the length of the side-chain increases resistance to gastric acid and increases the antibacterial spectrum.

Track 08: Antibiotic Resistance

Antibiotic resistance is the ability of bacteria to resist the effects of an antibiotic. Antibiotic resistance occurs when bacteria change in a way that reduces the effectiveness of drugs, chemicals, or other agents designed to cure or prevent infections. The bacteria survive and continue to multiply, causing more harm. Antibiotic resistance has been called one of the world’s most pressing public health problems. Antibiotic resistance can cause illnesses that were once easily treatable with antibiotics to become dangerous infections, prolonging suffering for children and adults. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are often more difficult to kill and more expensive to treat. In some cases, the antibiotic-resistant infections can lead to serious disability or even death. Antibiotics are not effective against viral infections like the common cold, flu, most sore throats, bronchitis, and many sinus and ear infections. Widespread use of antibiotics for these illnesses is an example of how overuse of antibiotics can promote the spread of antibiotic resistance. Smart use of antibiotics is key to controlling the spread of resistance. Bacteria can become resistant to antibiotics through several ways. Some bacteria can “neutralize” an antibiotic by changing it in a way that makes it harmless. Others have learned how to pump an antibiotic back outside of the bacteria before it can do any harm. Some bacteria can change their outer structure so the antibiotic has no way to attach to the bacteria it is designed to kill. After being exposed to antibiotics, sometimes one of the bacteria can survive because it found a way to resist the antibiotic. If even one bacterium becomes resistant to antibiotics, it can then multiply and replace all the bacteria that were killed off. That means that exposure to antibiotics provides selective pressure making the surviving bacteria more likely to be resistant. Bacteria can also become resistant through mutation of their genetic material.

Track 09: Bacterial vaginosis

Bacterial vaginosis is an abnormal vaginal condition that is characterized by vaginal discharge and results from an overgrowth of atypical bacteria in the vagina. It is not a true bacterial infection but rather an imbalance of the bacteria that are normally present in the vagina. Usually treatment is with an antibiotic, such as clindamycin or metronidazole. BV is the most common vaginal infection in women of reproductive age. In the United States about 30% of women between the ages of 14 and 49 are affected. BV is linked to an imbalance of “good” and “harmful” bacteria that are normally found in a woman’s vagina. Bacterial vaginosis results from overgrowth of one of several bacteria naturally found in your vagina. Usually, "good" bacteria (lactobacilli) outnumber "bad" bacteria (anaerobes). But if there are too many anaerobic bacteria, they upset the natural balance of microorganisms in your vagina and cause bacterial vaginosis. BV is a polymicrobial clinical syndrome resulting from replacement of the normal hydrogen peroxide producing Lactobacillus sp. in the vagina with high concentrations of anaerobic bacteria (e.g., Prevotella sp. and Mobiluncus sp.), G. vaginalis, Ureaplasma, Mycoplasma, and numerous fastidious or uncultivated anaerobes. Some women experience transient vaginal microbial changes, whereas others experience them for longer intervals of time.

Track 10: Food Poisoning Bacteria

Listeria bacteria can contaminate fresh produce, like cantaloupes, as well as some processed foods, like cheeses. Symptoms of infection include fever, muscle aches, upset stomach, or diarrhea. Salmonella bacteria can taint any food, although there's a greater risk from animal products because of contact with animal feces. In chickens, it can infect eggs before the shell forms, so even clean, fresh eggs may harbor salmonella. E. coli lives in the intestines of cattle and can contaminate beef during the slaughtering process. Ground beef is especially risky, because the bacteria can spread when meat is ground up. Symptoms of E. coli infection include severe abdominal cramps, watery diarrhea, and vomiting. The illness typically develops several days after exposure and can be severe in vulnerable people. Clostridium perfringens is a type of bacteria that causes cramps and diarrhea lasting less than 24 hours. Stews, gravies, and other foods that are prepared in large quantities and kept warm for a long time before serving are a common source of C. perfringens infections. Vibrio vulnificus is a bacteria that lives in warm seawater and can contaminate shellfish, particularly oysters. V. vulnificus infection causes the same gastrointestinal symptoms as many other foodborne illnesses, but in people with weakened immune systems it can develop into a life-threatening blood infection. Salmonella is an extremely common type of bacteria. These rod-shaped organisms can be found in both cold-blooded and warm-blooded animals across the world. They are also one of the most common causes of sickness in human beings. Salmonella poisoning can infect people in one of two ways. It is most often spread from animals to people through the food supply. This is how the bacteria can cause the nauseating disease gastroenteritis.

 

Track 11: Bacterial infections

Bacterial infections can cause a variety of conditions. Infections occur as bacteria enter the body or grow on the skin. Treatment for bacterial infection include taking medication. Common drug classes used to treat bacterial infections are penicillin antibiotics, quinolone antibiotics, macrolide antibiotics, cephalosporin antibiotics, tetracycline antibiotics, lincosamide antibiotics, nitroimidazole antibiotics, sulfa antibiotics, polypeptide antibiotics, oxazolidinone antibiotics, penem antibiotics, glycopeptide antibiotics, and monobactam antibiotics. Sepsis is the body’s often deadly response to infection. Sepsis kills and disables millions and requires early suspicion and treatment for survival. Sepsis can result from an infection anywhere in the body, such as pneumonia, influenza, or urinary tract infections. Bacterial infections are the most common cause of sepsis. Worldwide, one-third of people who develop sepsis die. Many who do survive are left with life-changing effects, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), chronic pain and fatigue, organ dysfunction (organs don’t work properly) and/or amputations. Bacteria must enter your body for them to cause an infection. So you can get a bacterial infection through an opening in your skin, such as a cut, a bug bite, or a surgical wound. Bacteria may also enter your body through your airway and cause infections like bacterial pneumonia. Other types of bacterial infections include urinary tract infections (including bladder and kidney infections) and dental abscesses, as well as infections caused by MRSA, Group B Streptococcus, and C. Difficile.

Track 12: Antibiotics in Oncology

Cancer patients develop neutropenia, a decrease in the subset of leucocytes responsible for protection against bacteria, as a result of chemotherapy or cancer. Neutropenia predisposes the patients to severe bacterial infections. Standard antibiotic regimens for cancer patients with neutropenia and fever are directed at most of the bacteria that can cause infections. However, a subset of resistant bacteria belonging to the gram-positive group (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococci) remain untreated unless specific antibiotics are added to the treatment. For patients receiving chemotherapy, there is an increased risk of infection due to a low white blood cell count (neutropenia) caused by a toxic effect of chemotherapy on the bone marrow. Antibiotic prophylaxis significantly decreased the risk of death when compared to no intervention. Antibiotic prophylaxis also decreased the risk of death from infection and the risk of development of fever.

Track 13: Anticancer Antibiotics

Laboratory-produced drugs used to target and destroy cancerous cells. Therapeutic anticancer antibiotics have become an accepted treatment for certain types of cancer. These drugs bind specifically to primary and metastatic cancer cells to block cell growth, while limiting effects on surrounding healthy cells. Also called antitumor antibiotics, anticancer antibiotics can also be used to treat or prevent infections brought on by cancer treatments. Any anticancer drug that affects DNA synthesis and replication by inserting into DNA or by donating electrons that result in the production of highly reactive oxygen compounds (superoxide) that cause breakage of DNA strands. These antibiotics are administered almost exclusively by intravenous infusion for the treatment of lymphoma and leukemia, nephroblastoma (Wilm tumour), sarcoma, and cancers of the testicle, the breast, the thyroid, the lung, and the stomach.

 

Track 14: Naturopathy for Bacterial Infections

Ayurvedic treatments have a good reputation because of the fewer side effects caused by them and also these are naturally available products and so it is not synthetically made which leads to no carcinogens in the ayurvedic products. Herbal remedies for bacterial infections comprise Aloe Vera, Neem, Barberry, Goldenseal, Garlic, Cinnamon, Thyme, Cloves, Cayenne Pepper, Horseradish, Cumin, Oregano, Basil, Rosemary, Lavender, Tea Tree, Nutmeg and Peppermint. Most of these herbs destroy the disease causing bacteria. Some herbs such as Echinacea combine antibacterial properties with immunostimulatory action. Herbal remedies which can cure bacterial infections with ease and efficacy. When antibiotics are used for a long time, it makes the disease causing microorganisms develop a defence against the action of these medicines, thereby, becoming totally unresponsive to medicines. This issue is becoming a huge concern for entire humanity that is threatening the validity and effectiveness of modern medicines. Ayurveda understands the delicate balance of nature and deals with diseases by taking a natural and balanced approach. Immunomodulatory rasayans in Ayurvedic medicines strengthen the body’s innate defence mechanism to fight diseases. As a result, disease causing microbes do not become drug resistant. Ayurvedic treatment is also safe for the gut microbiota and does not damage it. In addition to these obvious benefits, Ayurvedic treatment also acts on the root-cause rather than on symptoms. The ayurvedic products from the plants are rich in a wide variety of secondary metabolites which include flavonoids, tannins, alkaloids. These compounds are found to antimicrobial in nature. In Ayurveda, many herbal plants are used in treating bacterial infection and infectious diseases. Solvents extracts from certain herbal include Ajmodadi churna, Mahasudarshan churna, Triphala churna is found to have antibacterial properties against some bacterial pathogens include Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter aerogens, etc.

Track 15: Toxicity of antibiotics

The discovery of penicillin followed by streptomycin, tetracycline, cephalosporins and other natural, semi-synthetic and synthetic antimicrobials completely revolutionized medicine by reducing human morbidity and mortality from most of the common infections. The efficiency of antimicrobial treatment is determined by both pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. In spite of their selective toxicity, antibiotics still cause severe, life-threatening adverse reactions in host body mostly due to defective drug metabolism or excessive dosing regimen. Toxicity of antibiotics as well as antibiotic resistance mechanisms, resistome analyses and search for novel antibiotic resistance determinants with special emphasis given to the-state-of-the-art regarding multidrug efflux pumps and their additional physiological functions in stress adaptation and virulence of bacteria.

Why to attend?

CONFERENCE OBJECTIVES:

  • To facilitate and encourage contact among persons, groups or organizations interested in Bacteriology & Antibiotics
  • To provide an effective means to contribute to international scientific and technological knowledge in the area of Bacteriology & Antibiotics
  • To promote scientific cooperation among Bacteriologists in Canada and other countries.
  • To facilitate opportunities for networking, collaboration and exchange of ideas with internationally renowned leaders in Bacteriology & Antibiotics research.
  • To identify research and practice based innovations in optimizing Bacteriology research.
  • To debate gaps and priorities for sustainable development in optimizing Bacteriology & Antibiotics research and development.
  • To discuss and debate the challenges and opportunities in the new era of optimizing Bacteriology & Antibiotics research reforms.
  • To identify opportunities for evidence-based practice in optimizing Bacteriology & Antibiotics research and development.

YOUNG RESEARCHERS OPPORTUNITY:

  • Establishing their academic and professional relationships.
  • Improving their morale and confidence of presenting research in an international platform.
  • Interacting with expertise in their respective departments.
  • Clearing your inhibitions of adjusting to the foreign environment.
  • Providing a holistic experience of academic tourism.

 

Call for abstracts

Bacteriology 2019 brings you an immense opportunity to be a part of scientific acceleration to world class personalities, young scholars, scientific delegates and young scientists to join in this Conference to utilize the expertise and novelties that brings a new era for innovations in the field of Bacteriology & Antibiotics which brings well versed scrutinizers at one place. It provides a platform to have open discussions, knowledge sharing and interactive sessions with field experts at Bacteriology 2019. We request you to submit a brief idea or abstract of your talk/presentation/symposium/workshop according to your session interest. Please follow the format of our Sample Template.

Travel Guide & Visa Information

Conference Venue Details: https://bacteriology.conferenceseries.com/venue-hospitality.php

Find out what you need to visit Canada as a tourist or business person, how to extend your stay in Canada and what documents you need to carry with you to transit through Canada.

Application submission:

Canada does not have a visa office in every country so it is important that Delegates/Attendees visit the website of the visa office responsible for processing their visa applications.  Information is available on the website on how to submit a visa application and the documentation required. 

Delegates/Attendees are encouraged to submit their visa applications well in advance of the date of the event at a Visa Application Centre or on-line E-applications (e-Apps).

E-Apps

This system allows clients to submit applications online.

Delegates/Attendees that need a visa but require their passport for other travel purposes are strongly encouraged to submit their visa applications on-line (e-Apps).  Delegates/Attendees that choose to apply on-line will not have to submit their passport until a decision has been taken on their applications.  If required, the visa office will send the applicant instructions on how and where to send their passports to finalize the visa process.  

Visa Application Centres (VACs):

VACs are commercial service providers authorized by Canada to provide specific services to applicants. 

VACs provide a number of services including help applicants fill out forms, answer questions and ensure that applications are complete, thereby reducing unnecessary delays or refusals due to incomplete applications.

Applicants that are required to provide biometrics information as part of the visa application process can do so at a VAC.  Additional information on the biometrics requirements is available at the IRCC website.

VACs send applications to Visa Offices and transmit decisions to applicants in a secure and confidential manner. VACs do not process visa applications and play no role in the decision-making process.

Visa Applications Processing Time:

Processing time for visa applications vary depending on the office and the time of the year.  Participants should be encouraged to apply early for their visas, and to submit complete applications including all supporting documents.  

Please visit the IRCC website for information on the time it takes to process visa applications at the various visa offices. 

NEW - Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA)

As of March 15, 2016, visa-exempt foreign nationals are expected to have an Electronic Travel Authorization (eTA) to fly to or transit through Canada. Exceptions include U.S. citizens, and travellers with a valid Canadian visa. Canadian citizens, including dual citizens, and Canadian permanent residents are not eligible to apply for an eTA.

However, from March 15, 2016 until fall 2016, travellers who do not have an eTA can board their flight, as long as they have appropriate travel documents, such as a valid passport. During this time, border services officers can let travellers arriving without an eTA into the country, as long as they meet the other requirements to enter Canada. We invite you to consult the IRCC website regularly for information updates on eTA.

 

VISA Information For Delegates

It's the delegate's responsibility to investigate the visa requirements for Canada and to apply for a visa, if necessary. Individuals requiring an official Letter of Invitation from the conference organizers can request one by email by writing to us at [email protected]

To receive a Letter of Invitation, delegates, accompanying persons/children, student/post-doc/youth delegates and exhibitors must first register for the conference. The registration fee minus a handling fee of USD 100 will be refunded after the conference if the visa was applied for in time and proof is shown that a visa could not be granted even though all requested documents were submitted. Refund requests must be made in writing and sent to the Bacteriology 2019 via email. 

All expenses incurred in relation to the conference are the sole responsibility of the delegate. The Letter of Invitation does not guarantee an entry visa to Canada. However, the conference organizers will not directly contact embassies and consulates on behalf of delegates. 

The deadline for requesting a Letter of Invitation is two month before travelling to Canada.

Benefits for Delegates:

  • Meeting experts of their choice
  • Participation certification
  • Opportunity of obtaining special waiver if they are attending the conference in group from same organization
  • Networking and B2B meetings with the academic people attending the conference

For Delegates registration kindly visit: https://bacteriology.conferenceseries.com/registration.php

 

Pre-Conference Workshop Invitation

The conference authority is planning to organize a preconference workshop with your support in your university/lab on a title related to Bacteriology & Antibiotics or allied stream of your choice

The workshop can be scheduled as per your availability prior to main event. Workshop should be planned with 4-5 speakers and 40-50 attendees in the university or college premises.

All the required brochures & banners will be provided by us and will be sent to the venue of the preconference workshop before it's commencement.

The participants of this preconference workshop can be professors, associate professor, lecturer, instructor, counselors, or student of the same or different nearby universities.

In return we will provide certificate of participation to all the attendees signed by the organizer of the pre-conference workshop with prior confirmed list.

Bacteriology 2019 in Vancouver, Canada is the main event for which this preconference will be organized and to promote the attendance for the said main event.

Also all the workshop attendees will get an abatement of 25% on the registration for attending the conference of Bacteriology 2018.

Hope this will have more benefits than expected and help us mutually to run the conference successfully. We would highly appreciate your opinion on the said proposal and await your positive response towards this.

Why to attend?

Our Conference will provide a perfect platform addressing:

•          Laudable talks by the top-notch of the global scientific community

•          Sterling workshop sessions

•          Remarkable Awards and Global Recognition to meritorious Researchers

•          Global Networking with 50+ Countries

•          Novel Techniques to Benefit Your Research

For more information drop a mail on [email protected]

Past Conference Report

Bacteriology 2018

We gratefully thank all our wonderful speakers, conference attendees, students for making Bacteriology 2018 Conference the best ever!

The 6th International Congress on Bacteriology & Infectious Diseases hosted by the Conference Series LLC Ltd was held during May 21-22, 2018 at New York, USA based on the theme Exploring New Innovations and Frontiers in Bacteriology and Infectious Diseases. Benevolent response was received from the Editorial Board Members of Conference Series LLC Ltd Journals along with scientists, researchers, students and leaders from various fields of Bacteriology, who made this event a grand success. Conference Series will acknowledge with gratitude the support by all the Editorial Board Members of Journal of Bacteriology and Parasitology for their valuable suggestions for up growth of the Organization.

The conference was initiated with the Honorable presence of the Keynote forum. The list includes:

P R Raghavan, Nanorx Inc, USA

Lia Monica Junie, University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Romania

The meeting reflected various sessions, in which discussions were held on the following major scientific tracks:

  • Bacteriophage
  • Bacterial Oral/ Mouth Infections
  • Bacterial food infections
  • Emerging Infectious Diseases
  • Bacterial Pathogenesis
  • Natural Microbial Defences & Immunity
  • Multi Pathogen Infections
  • Microbial genomics
  • Industrial and Applied Bacteriology
  • Surgical site infections (SSIs)
  • Advances in Antimicrobial Vaccines
  • Market Analysis and Manufactures
  • Entrepreneurs Investment Meet
  • Bacterial pulmonary infections (Pneumonia)
  • Bacterial gastroenteritis
  • Bacteria and pollution control

Conference Series LLC Ltd offers its heartfelt appreciation to the Organizing Committee Members, adepts of field, various outside experts, company representatives and other eminent personalities who supported the conference by facilitating the discussion forums. Conference Series LLC Ltd also took privilege to felicitate the Organizing Committee Members, Editorial Board Members and Media Partners who supported this event.

With the grand success of Bacteriology 2018, Conference Series LLC Ltd is proud to announce the 7th International Conference and Exhibition on Bacteriology & Antibiotics to be held during April 24-25, 2019 at Vancouver, Canada. Bacteriology 2019 has been prepared with the aim and the specific intent of promoting the development of new perspectives and ideas for exploiting the high level of knowledge achieved by the scientific community in Bacteriology & Antibiotics disciplines.

For More details visit:  https://bacteriology.conferenceseries.com/

 

 

 

 


Past Reports  Gallery  

To Collaborate Scientific Professionals around the World

Conference Date April 24-25, 2019

For Sponsors & Exhibitors

[email protected]

Speaker Opportunity

Supported By

Journal of Bacteriology and Parasitology

Advances in Antibiotics & Antibodies

All accepted abstracts will be published in respective Conference Series LLC LTD International Journals.

Abstracts will be provided with Digital Object Identifier by


Keytopics

  • Advances In Infectious Antibiotics
  • Antibiotic Prophylaxis
  • Antibiotic Resistance & Prevention
  • Antibiotics For Diabetes
  • Antibiotics In Different Industries
  • Antibiotics: Industrial Scope
  • Applications Of Antibiotics
  • Ayurvedic Treatments
  • Bacterial Biochemistry
  • Bacterial Diseases In Humans
  • Bacterial Epidemiology
  • Bacterial Genomics
  • Bacterial Proteomics
  • Bacterial Vaccines
  • Bacterial-Fungal Interactions
  • Bacteriology In Public Health
  • Clinical Bacteriology
  • Entrepreneurial Investments
  • Food Bacteriology
  • Market Size Of Antibiotic
  • Medical Use Of Antibiotics
  • New Antibiotic Discoveries
  • Novel Antibiotics
  • Pediatric Antibiotics
  • Phyto Bacteriology
  • Plant Bacteriology